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Able Launch Bar

Able Launch Bar is a window similar to the Quick Launch bar. This is Application Desktop Toolbar with built-in Windows Explorer. Able Launch Bar offers a system of shortcuts far more superior than Quick Launch. Arranged into folders, they are just the same as folders in the Explorer window. In fact you can use the program as small file manager (as Windows Explorer). Able Launch Bar support for Drag & Drop helps quickly fill the folders with shortcuts from your desktop or start menu.
Some features:

  • Real folders as in Windows Explorer (unique)
  • Drag & Drop operations support
  • "AutoHide" and "Always on Top" options
  • Small or Large icons
  • Bumpless AutoHide
  • Compatibility with standard Quick Launch
  • Window Vista compatible
  • Drag & Drop
  • Multi column layout
  • Redistributing toolbars
  • Shortcuts scrolling (unique)
  • Opening delay (from hide state)
  • Easy installing

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Requirements

Able Launch Bar can be installed on modern Windows version: Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows 2003 Server, Windows Vista.

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Frequently asked questions

Q: I have chosen "Always on Top" option but it does not work, way?

A: "Always on Top" option has been disabled in trial version. Buy full version to remove this limitation. Register Now.

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Application desktop toolbar

An application desktop toolbar is a window similar to the Quick Launch bar, the Language Bar or the Windows Taskbar. It is anchored/docked to an edge of the screen, and it typically provides the user with quick access to various things like program shortcuts, favorite files, folders or URLs, information such as the local weather or sports news, or commonly used programs such as a clock, stopwatch or a calculator. Application desktop toolbars are allocated their own area on the screen and the system prevents other applications from using that area. Multiple application desktop toolbars can exist on the system at any time.

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Drag & Drop

The basic sequence involved in drag & drop is:

  • Press, and hold down, the button on the mouse, to "grab" the object,
  • "Drag" the object/cursor/pointing device to the desired location,
  • "Drop" the object by releasing the button.
Dragging requires more physical effort than moving the same pointing device without holding down any buttons. Because of this, a user cannot move as quickly and precisely while dragging. However, drag & drop operations have the advantage of thoughtfully chunking together two operands (the object to drag, and the drop location) into a single action.

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